HOUSING

 

In 2010, the median value of owner occupied housing rose to $143,149 from $83,700 in 2000. Median contract rent for rental units in 2010 was $445 per month in the county, up from $339 in 2000.

 

 

1990

2000

2010

Median Value of Owner Occupied Housing

$51,200

$83,700

 

$143,149*

 

 

Median Rent

 

$166

 

$339

 

$445**

Source: *2010 Census

**2005-2009 American Community Survey 5 Year Estimate

 










Housing Characteristics

Another essential characteristic of Highland County’s housing stock is its age. Approximately 50% of the existing homes were built prior to 1960. Nearly 28% were built before 1940. General housing guidelines state that a house more than 40 years old may require extensive renovation to remain a viable housing resource. While the majority of older homes in the county have been maintained or restored, some have not. While such problems do not appear widespread in Highland, it is important that the County stay abreast of the needs of residents living in older housing.

 

Occupancy Characteristics

In 2010, the average number of people per owner-occupied home was 2.12 and 2.07 per renter-occupied home. These figures represent declines from 2000 Census information, but are generally consistent with national trends toward smaller families.

 

The 2010 Census data reported a total of 1,837 housing units in the county. These are located fairly consistently around the county with 437 units in the Blue Grass section, 632 units in the Stonewall section and 768 units in the Monterey section according to the 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5 year estimate.

Close to 59% of housing units in the county are occupied according to the 2010 Census. It is estimated that about 57% of them are owner-occupied with approximately 12.5% are renter-occupied units. Almost 43% of the county’s housing units are vacant according to the American Community Survey 5 year estimate.

 

 

 

1990

2000

2010

ACS Est.

Avg. # Ppl/Owner Occupied House

2.43

2.28

n/a*

2.12**

Total Housing Units

1,759

1,822

1,837*

 

2,017**

 

Occupied Units

1,081

1,131

1,081*

 

1,147**

 

Owner-Occupied

878

948

n/a*

 

894**

 

Renter-Occupied

203

183

n/a*

 

253**

 

Vacant

678

691

756*

870**

Source: *2010 Census

2005-2009 American Community Survey 5 Year Estimate

 


















Having an adequate supply of affordable housing and the proximity of housing to job sites are important factors for quality of life. In 2003 the Virginia General Assembly passed HB 2406, requiring localities to designate areas and implement measures for the construction, rehabilitation and maintenance of affordable housing that is sufficient to meet the current and future needs of residents at all income levels in the locality.

 

 

“Affordable housing” according to Section 15.2-2201 of the Code of Virginia is: “Housing that is affordable to households with incomes at or below the area median income, provided that the occupant pays not more than 30% of gross income for gross housing costs, including utilities.”

 

There are several segments of the population who have specific housing needs not currently being met under market conditions. These include young families, workforce and /or “public servants” and senior citizens having need of assisted living facilities.

 

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